Section 7 - people from an ethnic minority

People from an ethnic minority are defined as those from an ethnic group other than ‘white British’.  They are treated as a particular group for the JSNA because it is important to ensure that the experiences and opportunities that affect people’s health and well-being are not dependent on their ethnic background.

The key points from the 2011 JSNA relating to people from an ethnic minority in Herefordshire are as follows:

  • Herefordshire has a relatively small, but growing, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) population: only 6% of residents were from a ethnic group other than ‘white British’ in 2009, but this is nearly one and a half times as many as in 2001 (compared to a growth of just 3% in the total population).  By far the largest minority group (4,300) is ‘white other than British or Irish’; which will include some of the county’s estimated 800-900 Gypsies, Roma and Travellers as well as migrants who have settled in the county from Eastern Europe.  See the ethnicity topic page for more details.

  • Increasing numbers of births (200 in 2009) are to mothers born outside the UK, mainly in Poland and other Eastern European countries.

  • Herefordshire continues to host several thousand temporary seasonal workers every spring and summer, mainly young men from Bulgaria, Romanian and Poland.  Most are accommodated on the farms where they work, and many return year after year. 

  • Although the educational achievement of Herefordshire pupils is good overall, there are still significant attainment gaps between pupils from different ethnic groups, notably Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) children.

  • A potential need for additional authorised pitches for Gypsies, Roma and Travellers in Herefordshire during the next ten years will require continued working with local communities.

Other relevant findings are:

  • A survey of the health needs of over 200 seasonal migrant workers in 2008, mainly young adult males from Poland, Bulgarian and Romania, found that the vast majority (89%) felt they were in good or very good health.  Only 5% said they had a disability, long-term illness or health problem which limited their daily activities or the work they could do - although 28% said they had back pain.  20% felt they faced barriers to healthcare - see the full report for more details.

  • A similar survey of the health needs of just under 50 Gypsies, Roma and Travellers in Herefordshire found that a third felt their health was bad or very bad, which is much higher than for the general population.  Just under half said they had a disability, long-term illness or health problem which limited their daily activities or work.  Just over a third felt they faced barriers to healthcare.  See the full report for more details.

Last updated: 21 September 2011