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Mental health (including suicide)

This section provides information on: 

Depression

Severe mental illness

Mental illness in children and young people

Mental health and alcohol

Excess mortality

Suicide

Approximately one in four people in the UK will experience a mental health problem each year[1] and in England one in six people report experiencing a common mental health problem (such as anxiety and depression) in any given week.[2]

Women are more likely to report that they suffering from a mental health problem than men (33 per cent compared to 19 per cent) and people from lower income households are more likely to be diagnosed with a mental health problem (27 per cent of men and 42 per cent of women in the lowest income quintile, compared to 15 per cent of men and 25 per cent of women in the highest quintile).[3]

By 2030, it is estimated that there will be approximately two million more adults in the UK with mental health problems than there were in 2013.[4]

In 2014/15, nearly two million people in England were in contact with mental health and learning disability services at some point in the year, an increase 5.1 per cent on the previous year.[5]

Improving mental health and wellbeing is associated with a range of better outcomes for people of all ages and backgrounds, including:

  • improved physical health and life expectancy
  • better educational achievement
  • increased skills
  • reduced health risk behaviours such as smoking and alcohol misuse
  • reduced risk of mental health problems and suicide
  • improved employment rates and productivity
  • reduced anti-social behaviour and criminality
  • and higher levels of social interaction and participation.[6]

Depression is one of the most common mental health problems.  In 2016/17, 8.1 per cent of patients aged 18 and over on Herefordshire GP practice registers had depression; a significantly lower proportion than nationally (9.1 per cent) and regionally (8.9 per cent).  Reflecting the national trend the prevalence of depression has increased year on year since 2012/13.  In 2016/17, the incidence of new diagnoses of depression as a proportion of GP practice registers (aged 18+) in Herefordshire was 1.3 per cent; lower than nationally (1.5 per cent).

In 2015/16, 0.81 per cent of people of all ages on GP practice registers in Herefordshire had a severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder or other psychoses), a lower proportion than nationally (0.90 per cent).

The Disability Rights Commission has reported on serious inequalities experienced, in terms of reduced life expectancy, by those with severe mental illness. There is extensive published evidence that people with severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia, die between 15 and 25 years earlier than the average for the general population.

One in ten children aged 5-16 years has a clinically diagnosable mental health problem and, of adults with long-term mental health problems, half will have experienced their first symptoms before the age of 14.

In 2016/17, the hospital admission rate for mental health disorders in children and young people aged 0 to 17 tears was 166.8 per 100,000 population in Herefordshire; significantly higher than in England as a whole (81.5 per 100,000) and in the West Midlands region (84.3 per 100,000).  The rate has been increasing since 2012/13 and the gap between Herefordshire and England is widening.[7]

Hospital admissions for mental health conditions in child and young people aged 0 to 17 years:

 

Source:  Public Health England

Hospital admissions for self-harm in children have increased in recent years, with admissions for young women being much higher than admissions for young men.

In Herefordshire, the rate of hospital admissions as a result of self-harm in persons aged 10 to 24 years was 365.6 per 100,000 in 2016/17; lower than nationally (404.6 per 100,000) and regionally (413.9 per 100,000).

Mental health problems are common among those needing treatment for alcohol misuse and alcohol misuse is common among those with a mental health problem.

In 2016/17, the rate of admissions to hospital for mental and behavioural disorders due to alcohol in Herefordshire was 31.5 per 100,000; much lower than in England as a whole (72.3 per 100,000) and the West Midlands region (76.6 per 100,000).

In 2014/15, the excess under 75 mortality rate in adults with serious mental illness, measured as a ratio of observed to expected mortalities and expressed as a percentage was 247.6 per cent in Herefordshire; significantly lower than nationally (370.0 per cent) and regionally (400.7 per cent).

Suicide is a significant cause of death in young adults, and is seen as an indicator of underlying rates of mental ill-health. Suicide is a major issue for society and a leading cause of years of life lost.

In 2014/16, the age-standardised mortality rate from suicide and injury of undetermined intent in Herefordshire was 11 per 100,000 population; higher than nationally (9.9 per 100,000) and regionally (10.0 per 100,000), but not significantly so.

The suicide rate among men is much higher than among women.  In 2014/16, the male suicide rate in Herefordshire was 17.5 per 100,000; the highest it has been since 2004/06 and higher than nationally (15.3 per 100,000) and regionally (15.9 per 100,000), but not significantly so. Residents of the most deprived areas of Herefordshire are approximately 19% more likely to die as a result of suicide than the county population in general.

Age-standardised mortality rate from suicide and injury of undetermined intent per 100,000 population (males):

 

Source:  Public Health England, Mental Health and Wellbeing JSNA

In 2014/16, the female suicide rate in Herefordshire was 4.6 per 100,000; the lowest it has been since 2003/05 and similar to nationally (4.8 per 100,000) and regionally (4.4 per 100,000).

Age-standardised mortality rate from suicide and injury of undetermined intent per 100,000 population (females):

 

Source:  Public Health England, Mental Health and Wellbeing JSNA

Further information on suicide in Herefordshire can be found in the report Suicide-an overview (July 2017) in the resource box below.

We are not responsible for the content or reliability of the linked websites. References or listings should not be taken as endorsement by Herefordshire Council of any kind. We cannot guarantee that these links will work all of the time and we have no control over the availability of linked pages.


[1] Adult psychiatric morbidity in England, 2007: results of a household survey. McManus, S., Meltzer, H., Brugha, T. S., Bebbington, P. E., & Jenkins, R. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care, 2009.  Available at: 
https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/adult-psychiatric-morbidity-survey/adult-psychiatric-morbidity-in-england-2007-results-of-a-household-survey

[2] Mental health and wellbeing in England: Adult psychiatric morbidity survey 2014, McManus S, Bebbington P, Jenkins R, Brugha T. (eds.). Leeds: NHS digital, 2016.  Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/adult-psychiatric-morbidity-survey-mental-health-and-wellbeing-england-2014

[3] Key facts and trends in mental health:  2016 update, NHS Confederation, 2016. 
Available at: http://www.nhsconfed.org/-/media/Confederation/Files/Publications/Documents/MHN-key-facts-and-trends-factsheet_Fs1356_3_WEB.pdf

[4] Key facts and trends in mental health:  2016 update, NHS Confederation, 2016. 
Available at: http://www.nhsconfed.org/-/media/Confederation/Files/Publications/Documents/MHN-key-facts-and-trends-factsheet_Fs1356_3_WEB.pdf

[5] Key facts and trends in mental health:  2016 update, NHS Confederation, 2016. 
Available at: http://www.nhsconfed.org/-/media/Confederation/Files/Publications/Documents/MHN-key-facts-and-trends-factsheet_Fs1356_3_WEB.pdf

[6] About Mental Health, NHS England.  Available
at: https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/about/

[7] Note: Comparisons between areas must be made with caution for this indicator. Local protocols are known to result in children and young people being counted as a hospital admission where similar hospital presentation and care in other areas would not be counted as such. It is likely that these figures reflect different protocols rather than differences in underlying health.

 

 

Related resources

 

Last updated: Thursday, August 23, 2018

  • Links to latest data
    1. Suicide prevention profiles

      Link to Public Health England's local area profile of suicide, associated prevalence, risk factors, and service contact among groups at increased risk.